Author: Sue Pickett

I am in the role of Additional Needs coordinator at Eltham High School, which also has a teaching component. I have a background in special education with a preference to working in a mainstream setting. I really enjoy the role of assisting students to have equitable access to an education. I believe the key to education is an ‘on the ground’ commitment to social justice which should be led by federal and state governments by providing an appropriate level of funding to support a whole school approach to disability rather than a divisive arrangement where students are either funded or not.

All teachers will experience through their teaching career, a mix of students in their classroom who have:

  • Different learning styles
  • A learning difficulty, which for example, may effect; their confidence, organisational skills, ability to start a task, copy from the board, plan for deadlines, use the school planner, speak in front of the class, complete a set of classroom or homework tasks. 
  • A disability which is not deemed serious enough to attract funding
  • The ability to manage well in all learning environments
  • Funding to support them due to a moderate to severe disability.

All teachers should be prepared to teach ‘The Mixed Ability Classroom.’


  • I continue to work with a highly skilled and committed team of Education Support staff to support students with a range of commonalities, strengths and challenges in a mainstream educational setting. In term 3 I have continued to write Individual Education Plans for students who require them – both Funded and Unfunded.

     

    In the last week of Term 3 the principal and I met with representatives from the state government to discuss the review of the Program for Students with Disabilities funding model.

    I will be running SSG’s and writing IEP’s for students who will be commencing in 2018.

‘Wanting to make a difference’ can of course be dismissed as an idealistic cliché, however any school community has much to gain from fully integrating students, providing an opportunity to benefit and learn from the experience of working with people who happen to also have a disability. Education of course is preparing for the future, but it also important to value every day of a life being lived.

Write comment (0 Comments)

Author: Sue Pickett

I am in the role of Additional Needs coordinator at Eltham High School, which also has a teaching component. I have a background in special education with a preference to working in a mainstream setting. I really enjoy the role of assisting students to have equitable access to an education. The key to education is an ‘on the ground’ commitment to social justice which should be led by federal and state governments by providing an appropriate level of funding to support a whole school approach to disability rather than a divisive arrangement where students are either funded or not.
All teachers will experience through their teaching career, a mix of students in their classroom who have:
  • Different learning styles
  • A learning difficulty, which for example, may effect; their confidence, organisational skills, ability to start a task, copy from the board, plan for deadlines, use the school planner, speak in front of the class, complete a set of classroom or homework tasks.
  • A disability which is not deemed serious enough to attract funding
  • The ability to manage well in all learning environments
  • funding to support them due to a moderate to severe disability
All teachers should be prepared and equipped to teach ‘The Mixed Ability Classroom.’
I continue to work with a highly skilled and committed team of Education Support staff to support students with a range of commonalities, strengths and challenges in a mainstream educational setting. In the last week of Term 3 the principal and I met with representatives from the state government to discuss the review of the Program for Students with Disabilities funding model.
 
In the last weeks of term 3, one of my areas of focus, has been to start the conversations with schools and parents of students who will be attending our school in 2019.
I am trying to ensure that they have as much information about the eligibility criteria for funding on the Program for Students with Disabilities as required and that I am across the areas of support they require. Student Support Group meetings will be scheduled early in term 4 for these new students.
The beginning of term 4 will have the Additional Needs program, finalising a display of teaching tool proformas for staff to access that will assist all students in the classroom. 
‘Wanting to make a difference’ can of course be dismissed as an idealistic cliché, however any school community has much to gain from fully integrating students, providing an opportunity to benefit and learn from the experience of working with people who happen to also have a disability. Education of course is preparing for the future, but it also important to value every day of a life being lived.
Write comment (0 Comments)

Author: Genovieve Fuser

Developing knowledge of language is fundamental in the mathematics classroom. The symbols, terms and words used in the classroom often come across as foreign words to many students, mainly because the words used are predominantly from Latin or Greek origin. For instance, words such as scalene, perimeter, numerator or quadrilateral can easily be forgotten. This may leave many students at a disadvantage. Therefore, it is imperative that teachers provide students with opportunities to enhance their numeracy skills through:

-          Critical reflection

-          Communication i.e. group work and collaboration

-          Questioning

-          Stimulating environments i.e. numeracy walls

-          Teaching vocabulary i.e. origins and meanings

 

This presentation will provide you with examples of worded problems encountered by students and the vocabulary they will investigate and develop along the way. Ideas on reflection and vocabulary development will also be explored. 

Write comment (0 Comments)

Author: Emily Paterson

Pleased to meet you, My name is Emily Paterson, a gal who has spent her life working in the performing arts both in and outside of the classroom.  I’ve met people from all walks of life and appreciate that performing arts has the ability to create the perfect childlike joy in some and strikes the upmost fear in the hearts others.   

 

With most things, the more we can understand a topic the more at ease we feel and the joy of Performing arts is that it lends itself to learning from each other so naturally.  If a supportive, encouraging and creative environment can be created you just never know what you can learn from the stranger sitting next to you. 

 

The role of the drama teacher to create that environment and together we will explore what this looks like to you, share the times we think we succeeded and lament and learn from the times we didn’t.  As casual relief teachers, it isn’t your job to have a grasp of the curriculum in all areas but have the classroom management skills to explore different areas and engage the minds of the people sitting in front of you to work it out together.  For those whom are new to performing arts it can seem rather chaotic and stressful, so how can we organise that chaos?

Write comment (6 Comments)

 

Using Technology to Support Students with Dyslexia

 

by Louise Hanrahan

Welcome to this blog for the TLN CRT workshop on Using Technology to Support Students with Dyslexia.  My name is Louise Hanrahan, and I have a passion for teaching students with Dyslexia.

Students with Dyslexia can feel overwhelmed by the amount of reading, writing, spelling, and organisation required to be successful at school.  We are fortunate in this day and age to have hundreds of excellent tools available to support students with Dyslexia in the classroom.

In this webinar, I will share with you some of the great technology resources I use for my students with Dyslexia.  These resources are suitable for all students. 

I am hoping that we can all learn from each other…… as I said, there are hundreds of apps out there!  I haven’t tried them all.  Have you found any apps worth sharing?

What do you know about Speech to Text apps? How are you using them in your class?

 

How do you use assistive technology in your class?

I have found the following links very helpful:

http://www.callscotland.org.uk/common-assets/cm-files/posters/ipad-apps-for-learners-with-dyslexia.pdf

https://www.greatschools.org/pdfs/e_guide_at.pdf?date=3-13-06&status=new

The second link it to ‘A Parents Guide to Assistive Technology.’ What questions do you ask yourself when you are evaluating a product? 

 

I appreciate your interest in this topic.  I look forward to reading your contributions.

 

Write comment (26 Comments)
Page 1 of 5