Author: David Innes

 

Differentiation is how we can tailor our classes to meet the needs of students on all ends of the developmental scale. It is a task that seems practically impossible to do - to cater for all types of students. The first thing to do is define what it means to be able to differentiate - what does it look like or sound like? The Victorian Government's High Impact Teaching Strategies set out differentiation to be in the form of scaffolded teaching, delivering metacognitive strategies and shaping the way students collaborate. This lecture looked at the theory behind it and a brief glimpse on how curriculum, lessons and units can be structured. As a CRT, you are often at the mercy of whatever material is left by the teacher. However, if you are in the position of being able to run the class as you'd like, then start with whatever the basic premise of the lesson is and find little ways to simplify it and make it more complex. 

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Author: Dave Vinegrad

As a CRT you need to manage a range of crises without flipping out or losing your cool.  The usual advice about this includes ‘remain calm’ or ‘don’t panic’.  Reassuring to know but much, much harder to do! 

Just as you go to enjoy a break in the staff room as by some miracle you have a free period and then the daily organiser grabs you and asks if you will cover a class with no teacher. It was missed in their covers and there is no lesson plan – a relatively simple crisis to manage.

You have no classroom key and the students have got themselves into the classroom and have locked the door. Several students are grinning at you from the other side of the door enjoying this mischief. Other students are throwing chairs, upending tables and damaging posters on the wall – how do you keep your cool and manage this?

 

This workshop will explain what happens to our brains when we go ‘red zone’ and how to manage most behavioural issues by taking an ‘outcomes’ focus.

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Author: Chizuko Inoue-Andersson

 

How do we know that our students are learning? Teachers who differentiate effectively use information that they have collected from formative assessment to plan new learning activities. Formative assessment involves checking for student understanding and monitoring student progress, allowing us to make informed judgments and differentiate the learning for each student. In this session, we will firstly have a look at the connection between formative assessment and effective differentiation using the information in one of the HITS (High Impact Teaching Strategies). We will also explore Dylan William’s five principles of formative assessment and explore practical formative assessment strategies. Finally, we will have an opportunity to learn about what kind of differentiation strategies we can use and how we can intervene to promote student learning.    

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Author: Chizuko Inoue-Andersson

 

What kind of language can we use to encourage our disengaged students? How can we establish and implement inclusive and positive interactions to engage and support all students in classroom activities? How can we provide timely, effective and appropriate feedback to students about their achievement relative to their learning goals? In this session, we will look at different kinds of informal feedback to promote a growth mindset and improve student engagement and learning. We will firstly explore Carol Dweck’s research on praise and find ways to promote a learning disposition that is not afraid of mistakes and that embraces difficulties as a challenge. Then we will learn about Hattie and Timperley’s three steps of feedback. Hattie’s research shows that feedback is one of the elements with the strongest impact on student learning, but not all feedback is equally useful. What kind of feedback is most helpful for our students? Finally, we will have a look at language and questions that we can start using in our future classes.  

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Author: Roland Lewis

 

Creativity is a key skill for successful contributors in the 21st Century.  One of the ways we help students learn creativity is through creative writing – but what is creative writing.  In my opinion any writing is creative writing – creativity is the ability to combine things that already exist to create something new.  When you reflect on writing, we draw on the words, concepts, thoughts, skills (the list goes on) to put them all together to create something new – piece of writing.  Creative writers engage with subjects that they are interested in and feel that they have the agency to commit pencil to paper to communicate their ideas to an audience.  Through tapping into visible learning strategies, making writing meaningful and strategically creating authentic audience for writing, we can help foster people who identify as writers.

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