Author: David Vinegrad

Trauma Informed Practice has the potential to enhance a whole school approach to wellbeing, positive behaviour, and strong relationships. As a CRT how can we include some of this theory in our ‘temporary relationships’ with students?

What happens to the developing brain when it can't cope with stress?
How do we define overwhelming stress and trauma?
What would be a good "relational model" of behaviour management to minimize trauma that might work for CRT’s.
 
The first part of this workshop will explore behaviour management for CRT’s and the impact it may have on students with a trauma background.  The second part will examine what is Trauma Informed Practice and how by taking this approach we can improve the well-being of young people as CRT’s.

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Author: Laura Zinghini 

Hello!

My name is Laura Zinghini and I have been a Drama and English Secondary teacher for 12 years. I am going to be discussing how to remove the fear and build confidence when public speaking for students in a secondary school setting. By looking at how students are obstructed by fear when they are public speaking and utilising strategies to overcome that fear of public speaking, we will assist students in all facets of life.

When I am teaching I try to utilise as many of these strategies as possible, and this in turn, informs my practise. Just remember, every student is an individual learner, and in order to cater to that learner, flexibility is key.

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Author: Dave Vinegrad

School-Wide Positive Behaviour Support (SWPBS) is a whole-school framework which provides school professionals with an approach to promote improved behaviour at their school.

SWPBS has been developed from evidence and data, demonstrating the most effective ways to prevent and respond to problem behaviour at school. Research has shown that SWPBS is successful in reducing problem behaviour, improving school culture, and increasing academic performance.

 

A key element to SWPBS is the establishment of a set of agreed classroom expectations. These expectations help establish the classroom norms for core subject teachers and CRT’s.  Teaching to these expectations is important to make the learning environment safe, predictable and productive for all involved. When classroom routines and classroom expectations are incorporated into the lesson plans teachers prepare for CRT’s the level of disruption and  lost instructional time can be greatly reduced as students are given a clear message that it is business as usual.

 

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Author: Laura Zinghini

 Hello!

 

My name is Laura Zinghini and I have been a Drama and English Secondary teacher for 12 years. I am going to be discussing how you can utilise knowledge to inform your practise when it comes to assisting EAL/D students in a secondary school setting. By looking at how we gather knowledge of students, we can understand how to effectively assist them, in order for them to become successful learners.

When I am teaching EAL/D students I utilise prior knowledge and observational knowledge. This is as simple as it sounds. What prior knowledge do I have of the students (with assistance from colleagues, family etc) and what do I observe of them within a classroom environment? This in turn informs my practise. It is that simple! This is because, every student is an individual learner, and in order to cater to that learner, I have to adapt my teaching style to suit their needs.

 

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Author: Hannah Galloway

This session will explore registration requirements for (fully) registered teachers and provisionally registered teachers and what you will need to provide to VIT if you are selected for a random audit. As a (fully) registered teacher, you make binding self-declarations about your maintenance of professional practice and containing suitability and fitness to teach each year when you renew your registration. To ensure the integrity of this process, we may randomly select you to verify your self-declarations.

 

If you are provisionally registered and submit an application for full registration, VIT may randomly select you for audit to verify you have met the requirements to move to (full) registration.

 

In this session we will explore the when, how and who of VIT audits and what you can do to ensure you have all the necessary documentation if you are selected for audit.

 

At the end of this session, you may want to consider the following questions:

          Am I aware of my registration requirements?

          Do I maintain clear records of my professional learning and teaching days?

 

          Does my professional learning align with the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers?

 

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