Author: Kate Chinner

 

 Physical Activity is important for everyone but particularly students in our schools. The Department is aiming for students to be doing an hour of physical activity a day in schools by 2025.

 

The benefits of physical activity for junior students include:

·         Promoting healthy growth and development

·         Building strong bones and muscles

·         Improving balance, coordination, and strength

·         Assisting with the development of gross motor and fine motor skills

·         Improving confidence and self-esteem.

Even though students are already quite active, we play an important role in ensuring they get an an adequate amount during the day. You can incorporate physical activities in between lessons, movement to or from specialists or a few minutes once students achieve a class reward, which is a great incentive to work for you during the day.

Some ideas for physical activity in junior classroom include

Outside games

·         Duck duck goose,

·         Hide and seek

·         What is the time Mr Wolf

·         Octopus

Inside Games

·         Musical statues

·         Teach students a dance or song with actions

·         Silent ball

Incorporate in learning

·         Treasure hunt (find letters, numbers, shapes, or colours)

·         Act out stories
·        Play maths games with movement

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Author: Kate Chinner

Creative Writing in the Upper Primary School

I am a Primary Teacher who has taught for over 10 years and I now work at the Teacher Learning Network as a Project officer. I have a passion for writing, particularly since 2010 when I wanted to develop myself as a writer and as a teacher of writing.

 How we can implement Creative writing in the Senior School

·         The Writers Notebook

The Writer’s Notebook is a launching pad for writing and place for collecting ‘seeds’ (writing ideas). Searching for and identifying pictures, drawings, lists, memories, wonderings,  photos and things that are individually relevant. In Junior grades, introducing a whole class Writer’s Notebook or in Year One and Two starting to develop their own notebook. In Senior grades, students have their own notebook they can treasure.

·         Give students Creative Writing time

Give students thinking time, planning and elaborating on their inspirational writing ideas. Harnessing their excitement and encouraging entries by discussing, sharing and supporting them through the process with their newly acquired ideas.

·         Teach writing craft strategies

As students are writing their own piece- explicitly teach writing craft strategies that                    they can place into their work  such as lift a line, show don’t tell, developing vocabulary.

 

My Tips for you:

·         Start your own Writer’s Notebook- collecting ideas, adding entries with different classes and sharing these with students. They will be connecting with you personally and with your writing. It is also adding to the collection of writing resources. 

·         Adding writing ideas, story starters and visual prompts into your ‘Bag of Tricks’

 

Links that I feel will help you develop Creative Writing.

http://livinglifetwice-alwrite.blogspot.com.au/ - is a blog from a writing coach Alan Wright. He has a huge amount of his thoughts and ideas about writing. I go here regularly to read his posts and to search if I need.

 

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/story-starters/ A fun website with story starters. 

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Author: Kate Chinner

Creative Writing in the Junior School

I am a Primary Teacher who has taught for over 10 years and I now work at the Teacher Learning Network as a Project officer. I have a passion for writing, particularly since 2010 when I wanted to develop myself as a writer and as a teacher of writing.

 

Developing creative writing in the junior school?

·         The Writer’s Notebook

 The Writer’s Notebook is a launching pad for writing and place for collecting ‘seeds’ (writing ideas). Searching for and identifying pictures, drawings, sketches, photos and things that are individually relevant. In Junior grades, introducing a whole class Writer’s Notebook or in Year One and Two starting to develop their own notebook.

·         Give students Creative Writing time

Give students thinking time, planning and elaborating on their inspirational writing ideas. Harnessing their excitement and encouraging entries by discussing, sharing and supporting them through the process with their newly acquired ideas.

My Tips for you:

·         Start your own Writer’s Notebook- collecting ideas, adding entries with different classes and sharing these with students. They will be connecting with you personally and with your writing. It is also adding to the collection of writing resources. 

·         Adding writing ideas, story starters and visual prompts into your ‘Bag of Tricks’

Links that I feel will help you develop Creative Writing.

http://livinglifetwice-alwrite.blogspot.com.au/ - is a blog from a writing coach Alan Wright. He has a huge amount of his thoughts and ideas about writing. I go here regularly to read his posts and to search on specific areas of need.

 

http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/story-starters/ A fun website with story starters. 

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Author: Sue Pickett

I am in the role of Additional Needs coordinator at Eltham High School, which also has a teaching component. I have a background in special education with a preference to working in a mainstream setting. I really enjoy the role of assisting students to have equitable access to an education. I believe the key to education is an ‘on the ground’ commitment to social justice which should be led by federal and state governments by providing an appropriate level of funding to support a whole school approach to disability rather than a divisive arrangement where students are either funded or not.

All teachers will experience through their teaching career, a mix of students in their classroom who have:

  • Different learning styles
  • A learning difficulty, which for example, may effect; their confidence, organisational skills, ability to start a task, copy from the board, plan for deadlines, use the school planner, speak in front of the class, complete a set of classroom or homework tasks. 
  • A disability which is not deemed serious enough to attract funding
  • The ability to manage well in all learning environments
  • Funding to support them due to a moderate to severe disability.

All teachers should be prepared to teach ‘The Mixed Ability Classroom.’


  • I continue to work with a highly skilled and committed team of Education Support staff to support students with a range of commonalities, strengths and challenges in a mainstream educational setting. In term 3 I have continued to write Individual Education Plans for students who require them – both Funded and Unfunded.

     

    In the last week of Term 3 the principal and I met with representatives from the state government to discuss the review of the Program for Students with Disabilities funding model.

    I will be running SSG’s and writing IEP’s for students who will be commencing in 2018.

‘Wanting to make a difference’ can of course be dismissed as an idealistic cliché, however any school community has much to gain from fully integrating students, providing an opportunity to benefit and learn from the experience of working with people who happen to also have a disability. Education of course is preparing for the future, but it also important to value every day of a life being lived.

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Author: Sue Pickett

I am in the role of Additional Needs coordinator at Eltham High School, which also has a teaching component. I have a background in special education with a preference to working in a mainstream setting. I really enjoy the role of assisting students to have equitable access to an education. The key to education is an ‘on the ground’ commitment to social justice which should be led by federal and state governments by providing an appropriate level of funding to support a whole school approach to disability rather than a divisive arrangement where students are either funded or not.
All teachers will experience through their teaching career, a mix of students in their classroom who have:
  • Different learning styles
  • A learning difficulty, which for example, may effect; their confidence, organisational skills, ability to start a task, copy from the board, plan for deadlines, use the school planner, speak in front of the class, complete a set of classroom or homework tasks.
  • A disability which is not deemed serious enough to attract funding
  • The ability to manage well in all learning environments
  • funding to support them due to a moderate to severe disability
All teachers should be prepared and equipped to teach ‘The Mixed Ability Classroom.’
I continue to work with a highly skilled and committed team of Education Support staff to support students with a range of commonalities, strengths and challenges in a mainstream educational setting. In the last week of Term 3 the principal and I met with representatives from the state government to discuss the review of the Program for Students with Disabilities funding model.
 
In the last weeks of term 3, one of my areas of focus, has been to start the conversations with schools and parents of students who will be attending our school in 2019.
I am trying to ensure that they have as much information about the eligibility criteria for funding on the Program for Students with Disabilities as required and that I am across the areas of support they require. Student Support Group meetings will be scheduled early in term 4 for these new students.
The beginning of term 4 will have the Additional Needs program, finalising a display of teaching tool proformas for staff to access that will assist all students in the classroom. 
‘Wanting to make a difference’ can of course be dismissed as an idealistic cliché, however any school community has much to gain from fully integrating students, providing an opportunity to benefit and learn from the experience of working with people who happen to also have a disability. Education of course is preparing for the future, but it also important to value every day of a life being lived.
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